Real Estate Information

Dwell Realty Blog

Connie Yoshimura

Blog

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 156

Post Title

by Connie Yoshimura

West Gate Sat/Sun 1-4                                   HULTQUIST HOMES                                       Steve Bohannon 538-5347                           Directions: From Raspberry Road, left on Sand Lake Road, right on Kincaid Road, left on WestPark Drive, right on Gate Creek Drive

Huffman Timbers Sat/Sun 1-4                       HULTQUIST HOMES                                       Steve Day 301-0055                                   Doug Goodwin 947-3829                           Directions: South on Seward Hwy, take Huffman exit, left on Huffman, left on Lake Otis, right on Timberview Drive

Huffman Timbers Sat/Sun 1-4                       JOHN HAGMEIER HOMES                                       Anita Bates 244-6188                                   Chris Constant 947-9438                           Directions: South on Seward Hwy, take Huffman exit, left on Huffman, left on Lake Otis, right on Timberview Drive

Liberty Square Sat/Sun 1-4                       HULTQUIST HOMES                                     Jeri Rodriguez 441-7194                                   Erica Koitzsch 782-9893                                 Directions: From Debarr, north on Turpin, left on Whisperwood, left on Skwentna Drive

Iron Tree Sat/Sun 1-4                                 HULTQUIST HOMES                                       Erica Koitzsch 782-9893                               Brant Heidlebaugh 230-1766                           Directions: From Northern Lights Blvd, north on Boniface Pkwy, left on E 24th Ave, right on Iron Tree.

Potter Highlands Sun 1-4                                 JOHN HAGMEIER HOMES                             Connie Yoshimura 229-2703                               Directions: South on New Seward Highway, left on Potter Valley Road, continue 2.8 miles up, continue around fork in road, follow to left on Potter Highlands Drive.

Resolution Pointe Sun 1-4                             JOHN HAGMEIER HOMES                             Anita Bates 244-6188                                 Directions: Minnesota to W 100th Ave exit, take right and continue down 100th which turns into Resolution Pointe, left onto Easter Island Circle

GrayHawk Sat 1-4                                     HULTQUIST HOMES                                        Chris Constant 947-9438                             Steve Day 301-0055                             Directions: From Lake Otis go East on 80th thru the 4 way stop, right on Sandy, left on GrayHawk Circle.

The Terraces Sat/Sun 1-4             HULTQUIST HOMES                                          Brant Heidlebaugh 230-1766                         Jackie Pearson 952-2999                         Directions: Heading North on Lake Otis Pkwy from Huffman Road turn right onto Tulin Park Loop, turn right to stay onto Tulin Park Loop, Turn right onto Morgan Loop.

Why I Love Selling New Homes

by Connie Yoshimura

Today is the last day for the Parade of Homes and I want to encourage you to visit the homes that are open from noon to 6 pm because there is something special about a brand new home. It is a blank page which a new homeowner can fill with their own dreams and memories. I love to sell new homes because they are free of the past. The turning of the soil, the fresh smell of the lumber drop, walking the subfloor creates the dreams of the future. There are thousands of parts to a new home and building one requires hundreds of hours of coordination and planning. Buying new allows a buyer to personalize their home and receive the benefits of advanced technology and design. Over the years, wiring, appliances, shingles, furnace and windows have all improved.  

 

This year there are only 24 homes entered into the Parade.  Anchorage’s new single family homes remain at record lows with only 113 permitted through July. Only Hultquist Homes, Spinell Homes and Troy Davis have built more than 17 homes so far this year. Home ownership is the dream and backbone for social stability and wealth creation in our country. Unfortunately, that opportunity is more expensive and has fewer choices. Popular new home communities include Huffman Timbers with 11 permits and Resolution Pointe 10. Under construction is Resolution Bluffs with unique and luxurious home sites from $239,000. WestGate, only minutes from Kincaid Park, has 8 duplex condos permitted on large R2A lots, giving condo buyers a unique opportunity to have spacious backyards. All three of these communities are open today. 

 

Anchorage has finally recognized its housing crisis and how it scrambles to solve the housing needs of almost 300,000 people has yet to be seen. But, one thing is certain. Anchorage needs to support its local builders. The need is great for basic efficient housing for the homeless andnew hillside developments for the growing families. In the Parade this year, you’ll visit ranch homes for baby boomers and entry level condos for the new millennial buyer.  

 

The primary objection to a new home is that it will cost more, perhaps as much as twenty percent according to national statistics. But what price can you put on a more livable floor plan, personalization, energy efficiency, smart and healthy living with improved air quality and no surprising or unexpected costs for repairs and maintenance.

Changes Coming for Accessory Dwelling Units

by Connie Yoshimura

On Monday, October 2, 2017, the Planning and Zoning Commission will hear a request from the Anchorage Assembly amending the Municipal Code for Accessory Dwelling units. It is one of the many attempts by the MOA to help fix Anchorage’s affordable housing crisis by adding new housing units as the number of new housing has remained at historic lows for the past few years, with 2017 being no exception. According to the case description, the recommended modifications to the Title 21 chapters pertaining to ADU’s are ‘intended to expand the supply of residential rental units, make homeownership easier to attain and sustain, and encourage the development of this type of alternative housing. This change will allow more efficient use of residential property, development that is compatible with existing neighborhoods and more affordable housing alternatives.’ One positive change is the ability to have an ADU in the R1 (single family zone) as long as it is within or attached to the primary dwelling. Home builders have struggled with the ‘mother-in-law’ request from new home buyers for the past ten years. This clears up the in and out installation for stoves and other appliances in family rooms.

One ADU detached from a single family dwelling is also permitted on a lot, tract or parcel that is 10,000 square feet or greater and the detached single family dwelling is the only principal structure. An ADU is also allowed if the lot, tract, or parcel abuts an alley and the ADU is above a detached garage. This provision will make legal the many ADUs already existing in the alleys of South Addition and add to the number of housing units downtown. What will be most interesting to observe, however, is how the community will respond to the ability for a homeowner to now add an ADU on a 10,000 single family lot. I can think of many single family subdivisions in Anchorage and Eagle River where within the subdivision lot sizes vary from 6,000 square feet (the minimum for an R1 lot) to over 10,000 square feet which in particular occurs at the end of cul-de-sacs. Unless the covenants, codes and restrictions for the subdivision particularly restrict ADU’s, it is my assumption that an ADU would be permitted. The only way for the homeowners to prevent ADU’s would be to amend their covenants, codes and restrictions, many of which are decades old. Without an active homeowners association that will be virtually impossible to do. New home communities, of which there are very few being developed, will have to specifically address the right to allow or not allow ADUs on any lot created greater than 10,000 square feet.       

These are all positive and less restrictive changes from the current ADU requirements and I applaud the MOA, planning department and others who have participated in many meetings to get us to this point. However, here’s the catch. Any landowner operating or seeking to establish an ADU must obtain a building or land use permit. The landowner must also submit an affidavit on a form provided by the MOA, affirming that at least one landowner will occupy the principal dwelling or the accessory unit. The permit and affidavit shall be filed as a deed restriction with the Anchorage recording district to indicate the presence of the ADU and the requirement of owner-occupancy for at least six months out of the year. So my questions are who is going to enforce the owner -occupancy requirement? The zoning enforcement department primarily responds to complaints relating to health and safety. How will the properties with ADUs be financed?  As single family residences or owner-occupied duplexes? And, finally, the recorded deed restriction will be difficult to amend or remove should the current landowner or future buyer decide he/she would like to spend eight months in Arizona rather than six or take a year long assignment overseas. 

Changes Coming for Accessory Dwelling Units

by Connie Yoshimura

On Monday, October 2, 2017, the Planning and Zoning Commission will hear a request from the Anchorage Assembly amending the Municipal Code for Accessory Dwelling units. It is one of the many attempts by the MOA to help fix Anchorage’s affordable housing crisis by adding new housing units as the number of new housing has remained at historic lows for the past few years, with 2017 being no exception. According to the case description, the recommended modifications to the Title 21 chapters pertaining to ADU’s are ‘intended to expand the supply of residential rental units, make homeownership easier to attain and sustain, and encourage the development of this type of alternative housing. This change will allow more efficient use of residential property, development that is compatible with existing neighborhoods and more affordable housing alternatives.’ One positive change is the ability to have an ADU in the R1 (single family zone) as long as it is within or attached to the primary dwelling. Home builders have struggled with the ‘mother-in-law’ request from new home buyers for the past ten years. This clears up the in and out installation for stoves and other appliances in family rooms.

One ADU detached from a single family dwelling is also permitted on a lot, tract or parcel that is 10,000 square feet or greater and the detached single family dwelling is the only principal structure. An ADU is also allowed if the lot, tract, or parcel abuts an alley and the ADU is above a detached garage. This provision will make legal the many ADUs already existing in the alleys of South Addition and add to the number of housing units downtown. What will be most interesting to observe, however, is how the community will respond to the ability for a homeowner to now add an ADU on a 10,000 single family lot. I can think of many single family subdivisions in Anchorage and Eagle River where within the subdivision lot sizes vary from 6,000 square feet (the minimum for an R1 lot) to over 10,000 square feet which in particular occurs at the end of cul-de-sacs. Unless the covenants, codes and restrictions for the subdivision particularly restrict ADU’s, it is my assumption that an ADU would be permitted. The only way for the homeowners to prevent ADU’s would be to amend their covenants, codes and restrictions, many of which are decades old. Without an active homeowners association that will be virtually impossible to do. New home communities, of which there are very few being developed, will have to specifically address the right to allow or not allow ADUs on any lot created greater than 10,000 square feet.       

These are all positive and less restrictive changes from the current ADU requirements and I applaud the MOA, planning department and others who have participated in many meetings to get us to this point. However, here’s the catch. Any landowner operating or seeking to establish an ADU must obtain a building or land use permit. The landowner must also submit an affidavit on a form provided by the MOA, affirming that at least one landowner will occupy the principal dwelling or the accessory unit. The permit and affidavit shall be filed as a deed restriction with the Anchorage recording district to indicate the presence of the ADU and the requirement of owner-occupancy for at least six months out of the year. So my questions are who is going to enforce the owner -occupancy requirement? The zoning enforcement department primarily responds to complaints relating to health and safety. How will the properties with ADUs be financed?  As single family residences or owner-occupied duplexes? And, finally, the recorded deed restriction will be difficult to amend or remove should the current landowner or future buyer decide he/she would like to spend eight months in Arizona rather than six or take a year long assignment overseas. 

Decks are Popular, Personal and Expensive

by Connie Yoshimura

Everybody wants an expansive deck to enjoy our fleeting summer days. Almost all new home buyers ask to increase the size of the builder’s deck. And it is a popular remodeling request as well. Decks come in all sizes, shapes and materials because decks are one of the most personal features of any home. Decks are for BBQing, sitting in the sun (what sun?), entertaining, meditating over a sunset or telescoping wildlife. But they all have one thing in common—they’re expensive! The beginning of any deck is the MOA requirement that a 3 x 3 landing must be outside of any opening door. From there, decks grow beyond the standard builder deck of 4 x 8. Code requires decks that are more than 30 inches off the ground to have a railing system. That requires pilings. Pilings cost anywhere from $270 to $370 each and the number of pilings depends on the size and shape of the deck as well as soils conditions. Any deck over 30 inches in height must also have stairs. A set of three to four stairs generally costs between $400 and $500. Second story decks are particularly expensive because of the heavy timbers required to support them and the number of stairs to the ground if the buyer wants access to their backyard. One negative to a second story deck is the shadow it can create blocking sunlight to the windows on the first floor.  

Some builders charge by the square foot for decks which includes pilings, rails and steps. Other builders will give you a square foot cost and then add on for the additional items. One reason why decks are so expensive is that they are labor intensive. Generally speaking, a builder will charge less for a deck if the buyers decision to expand the deck is built into the plans or made prior to framing. Then, the framer can build the deck and the sider can top it off. Otherwise, adding on to any landing or small deck requires a change order and a multitude of hands to manage the change.  

Due to what seems like our never ending rainy season, covered decks are becoming increasingly popular in Alaska. The MOA does not have any code requirements for a roof over a deck—at least not yet but it is still expensive. Trex is the most expensive and theoretically the most durable material for a deck. Trex is made from 95% recycled materials, including reclaimed wood and sawdust as well as recycled plastic from plastic overwraps found on paper towels, toilet paper, dry cleaning bags, newspaper bags, grocery and shopping bags. It is considered more durable and maintenance free and in general a more consistent product than cedar or other wood species. It does, however, scratch, despite claiming to be scratch resistant. There are several types of trex but in general it costs $4 to $7 more per square foot than cedar. A popular deck amenity is a cable rail which is three to four times more expensive than a standard wood railing. 

 

Finally, on a personal deck note, for over 20 years, I’ve had a small deck with pavers and a roof outside my kitchen. It has double garden doors. Occasionally, we’ve opened one of the doors. This summer when hosting a small group, I suddenly realized both doors could be opened! Sure enough, it has now become the most popular area in the home for family and guests! If only I had opened that second door twenty years ago.

A Mid-Year Look at MOA Building Activity

by Connie Yoshimura

Anchorage single family permits still lag behind last year’s with a total of only 95 new home permitted through June 2017 compared to 106 in 2016. However, the good news is a total of 300 new housing units have been permitted compared to 208 in 2016 thanks to a big boost in multi-family development earlier this year. Overall, however, total new construction activity at $282,604,732 is down $10 million which is only a 5% drop from 2016, a surprising low dip. Commercial construction continues to outpace residential by almost 30%. Other highlights of the mid- year permit summary show a 25% increase in new elevator permits with 105 issued which is perhaps a nod to our aging boomer population. And as can be expected, structural and electrical permits have fallen proportionate to the continued slide of single family permits. 

Huffman Timbers, Resolution Pointe and WestGate are Anchorage’s most popular new home communities with 10, 9 and 6 permits respectively. However, one has to wonder when these lots are absorbed where the next new residential development will emerge. Huffman Timbers has only 20 plus lots left; Resolution Pointe less than a handful of lots priced under $150,000 and WestGate is an attached townhouse style condo community on R2A lots. The need for small single family lots continues despite the unit small lot subdivision ordinance designed for primarily downtown and Fairview infill and the proposed accessory dwelling unit still in draft by the AEDC subcommittee on housing which will add rental housing but fails to address ownership opportunities.  

Troy Davis, who builds in Eagle River, has pulled 16 single family permits so far this year. Following closely behind is Spinell Homes with 15 and Hultquist with 13.  Hagmeier Homes has 5 permits as does a new builder, MGJ.  Crown Pointe and Merit have four each and you have to wonder how any of the remaining builders can even stay in business with less than a handful of permits. What is most interesting, however, is that owner/builders continue to capture a significant number of permits at 15. This builder group, which are not licensed as general contractors and do not have residential endorsements, build primarily on individual and isolated lots on the hillside and in Eagle River. Their permit value is slightly lower than the average single family value of $423,289 which does not include any value for the lot.    

So if you build it, it will sell is probably the best way to describe the new home market as long as the builder is smart about design and amenities so that their product competes well with aging resale properties.  That’s most likely true whether it’s a new condo built to five-star energy standards with solid surface countertops and laminate flooring or an $800,000 plus luxury home on the hillside. 

 

Continued Stability in Anchorage Housing Market

by Connie Yoshimura

While the housing market in the lower 48 is booming with new home communities and an active resale market with 6% to 18% appreciation, the Anchorage housing market remains stable, despite the state’s economic woes. Thanks, in part, to a continued lack of new home construction, the Anchorage market has lost less than 1% in value on single family sales in the past 18 months. A six month summary of building permits shows 300 new housing units permitted in 2017, but with two-thirds of them in the duplex and multi-family category. Only 95 single family homes have been permitted during the first six months of this year with an average value of $423,289. That number does not include the lot cost. If an average lot with public water, sewer and paved road costs $140,000 that puts the average new home around $600,000 compared to the MLS average sales price of $365,000.  That’s a mind boggling difference between brand new and pre-owned for buyers when doing comparable shopping. If you can find a new construction home under $500,000, my advice is to buy it! 

Four builders make up over 60% of the permits with each between 16 and 13 permits. Those builders are Troy Davis, Hultquist Homes, Spinell and the ever increasingly popular owner/builder who builds primarily on isolated lots on the hillside. Generally from the construction trades, these do it yourself builders hope to save a 6% profit which after it is all said and done is the hoped for profit from larger builders with a general contractors license and residential endorsement.      

Resale homes generally have landscaped and larger lots and a lower price per square foot even if they have been remodeled. In order for builders to compete with resale properties, they need to create a different product such as ranch homes or include the popular open two-story great room in their designs. Buyers for new homes are also requesting triple and even four car garages. Many of today’s new two-story homes get stretched to 3,000 square feet. Incremental square footage for bedrooms and living areas is relatively less expensive than kitchens and bathrooms—the two most expensive rooms in any home. Some buyers are willing to pay for a higher price per square foot to not have to worry about potential roof and furnace replacements in an older home. And for those of us who have remodeled, once you start you know it is hard to stop. The idea of a fresh coat of paint and new carpet suddenly makes those brass light fixtures look pretty dated.

On a weekly basis, Anchorage has about 100 more homes on the market than last year. Yet, prices have remained stable, although there is more negotiation between buyers and sellers. There is also a widening disconnect between original list price and final sale. That decline is 3.45 percent and does not take into consideration any seller paid closing costs on the buyer’s behalf. However, the real test of the market will be this coming fall buying season. Mortgage rates remain at near historic lows and well – maintained resale homes that are less than 20 years old are hard to find. Housing permits are at historic lows. So far, the state’s economic woes has had little impact on our local housing market and that’s my prediction for the end of the year. 

Who's Responsible for Site Work Problems?

by Connie Yoshimura

Soil conditions in Alaska can and do vary widely from street to street and even lot to lot in residential development. No matter how many test holes are dug prior to building a road or putting in a foundation, there are almost always surprises—some good and some not so good. So who’s responsible if the ground has settled around a foundation, over utility trenches or in other areas of a homeowner’s lot?  The performance guidelines for virtually all warranty items, published for Professional Builders and Remodelers by the National Association of Home Builders, is the go to bible that almost all Alaskan builders follow. So the performance guideline for this particular problem is “Settled ground around foundation walls, over utility trenches, or in other filled areas should not interfere with water drainage away from the home”. The corrective measure requires the contractor who provided the final grading to fill areas that settle more than six inches or that affect proper drainage. The contractor is responsible only during the warranty period and must comply only one time. The contractor should make a good faith effort to preserve plantings but interestingly enough, it is not his responsibility to replace shrubs, grass, pavement, sidewalks or other improvements affected by the repair.  

If the property does not properly drain it is the builder’s responsibility to ensure drainage within 10 feet around the home or whatever is required by municipal code. This is the rainy season in Alaska and standing water should not remain for extended periods (no more than 24 hours) within 10 feet of the home except in swales that drain other areas or in areas where sump pumps receive discharge. A heavy rain allows for 48 hours to dissipate. But wait! Not everything is the responsibility of the contractor. The homeowner also has responsibility to maintain grass and other landscaping to help ensure the property drainage system functions properly. It is their responsibility to maintain grades and swales that have been installed by the contractor. And, unfortunately, some inexperienced landscapers ignore the need for proper drainage and create retaining walls or flowering beds that interfere with proper drainage. This is a fairly common problem between property owners with smaller lots on the hillside where a drainage ditch or swale may run down a common lot line and due to differences in grade one property owner builds a retaining wall. Then, water from the adjacent property moves onto the consumer’s property. The contractor is not responsible for water flowing from a nearby or adjacent property. The downhill flow of water is a natural occurrence and each property owner must own up to their individual responsibility. 

Proper drainage first begins with the land developer who must submit a drainage plan to the MOA before he/she is granted a permit to build the subdivision. The home builder must then comply with the drainage plan but so must the homeowner who is responsible for the long term maintenance of such grades and swales, including but not limited to any soil erosion after construction is completed. It is the contractor’s responsibility to preserve existing landscaping and/or natural vegetation wherever possible but the survival of existing vegetation is never guaranteed, especially in Alaska where roots are shallow.

What Can You Buy for $700,000?

by Connie Yoshimura

Anchorage has had sixteen homes sell so far this year with an original list price between $700,000 and $850,000. There are also six pending sales and currently nine homes for sale in this price range. One home sold downtown built in 1939 and a bluff home sold that was built in 1975. However, half of the pending and sold homes have been built since 2000. The more recently built homes vary in price per square foot between $185 and $337, depending on location and style with ranches being the most expensive and homes with basements the least expensive per square foot. Although we frequently lament the high cost of our housing, the price per square foot and age of these homes seem modest when compared to some lower ’48 markets. 

In San Antonio, Texas, a home built in 1902 with 3,637 square feet has an asking price of $695,000. It was recently remodeled in 2015 and is located in an eclectic historic district I suspect similar to our original township. Price per square foot is $191. In the center of Houston on a cul-de-sac, a newer home built in 1981 has an asking price of $689,000 and is 1,916 square feet. That $360 price per square foot is higher in this price range than any new construction reported in Anchorage through MLS. The location of the cul-de-sac is inside the Inter-state 610 loop around the center of Houston which is famous for its lack of zoning. Although, it’s been several years since I’ve been to Houston, I’m assuming this area is similar to the subdivisions in southeast Anchorage where most lots are serviced by public utilities and are less than a quarter of an acre. The lot for this home is 0.11 acres. 

In Omaha, Nebraska, which is home to Warren Buffett and his conglomerate of Berkshire Hathaway companies, a 1975 home with three bedrooms and three baths has an asking price of $715,000 and sits on a quarter acre lot. With 3,890 square feet, it calculates to $184 a foot. In Bucks County, Pennsylvania, about forty miles south of Philadelphia, you can buy a 1,296 square foot stone cottage built around 1705 for $699,000! I think I’ll pass on that one as I’m not much of an historic preservation buff.  

What’s interesting about all these homes, however, is that they all have outdoor spaces which add to the value of the property. Some have a summer cottage perhaps similar to our accessory dwelling units. Others have multiple seating areas, terraces, landscaped lighting, sculpture gardens, extra parking and detached garages. Anchorage homeowners are also wanting these exterior amenities. Almost every new home buyer wants a deck larger than the customary 4 x 8 builder provided deck. And almost all want the maintenance free Trex, even though its cost per square foot is about $12 to $20 more per square foot. The MOA also has a rule that requires any deck higher than 30 feet off the ground must have a rail and steps. More and more buyers are also looking for enlarged or a supplemental detached garage. And despite moose and Alaska weather, more and more home buyers are spending thousands on landscaping, even if for a brief summer aesthetic. So maybe Anchorage homeowners aren’t so different than the rest of the country when it comes to wants and desires. And maybe our homes aren’t as old and expensive as we’ve been lead to believe.

What Factors Influence a Move to a New Home?

by Connie Yoshimura

The construction quality is the most important factor in all price ranges, according to the National Association of Home Builders’ recent survey. However, entry-level and moderate income buyers are also significantly influenced by financing. Sellers and builders offering financial incentives can help generate a faster sale. Alaska is lucky in that regard because we have several mortgage programs that incentivize and assist buyers with closing costs and down payments. Builders, in particular, often offer closing costs with matching assistance from most local mortgage lenders. If you’re looking for significant financial assistance, a builder’s finished inventory is a good place to start or a private seller whose home has been on the market longer than 60 days.

Most of Anchorage’s housing stock is old, really old. Four-star quality construction built in the 1980’s doesn’t begin to compare to the five-star quality today. Older homes need new roofs, furnaces as well as cosmetic remodeling. There’s a reason why we have all those Home Depots and Lowe’s. So it is interesting that building permits remain at historic lows in Anchorage. That stagnation can only be attributed to lack of financing and over regulation and not to demand.

But not so surprising, next to construction quality and financing, the exterior design of the home is a major factor in both moderate and high income buyers’ home selection. As someone who regularly holds open houses, I often see the ‘drive-by’ buyer. They follow the open house signs and keep right on going. They reject the home based on the exterior design. It may be the color, lack of landscaping or the specific orientation of the house on the lot. It is unfortunate that some builders don’t pay as much attention to the exterior elevation of the home as they do their interior selections. What color to paint the home sometimes becomes just a worn out after thought. Heavy timbers, stone wainscoting, cedar shakes, elevated and differing roof lines, even the color of the front door can all contribute to making a sale. However, the responsibility for an attractive exterior elevation and, thus, street scape, begins with the developer of the community. Strong architectural control can make the difference between a successful new home community and one that languishes.  

Other factors influencing a move include proximity to highways and easy community to work. We’re lucky that Anchorage still has easy commutes except on Tudor Road between four and five pm. In my experience, however, what’s also interesting is that east Anchorage residents rarely make a move across town to the west but will go southeast. The same is true for Sand Lake residents. It seems familiarity for routes to work, stores, shopping and schools plays an important role in a move-up to a new home. Also, high on the list of move factors is proximity to extended family and this is certainly true for our population. Anchorage has two large buying groups—boomers and millennials and we are seeing more and more grandparents moving to be near their grandchildren. 

 

As can be expected, high income buyers place a greater emphasis on the prestige/cache of the neighborhood than do moderate income buyers. In Anchorage, higher end buyers tend to cluster on the hillside, Old Turnagain and the downtown area. They are also more interested in public school performance although neither group places significant importance on religion or proximity to places of worship.

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 156

Share This Page

Contact Information

Photo of  Real Estate
Dwell Realty
3230 C Street Suite 100
Anchorage AK 99503
907-646-3600